Title I Migrant Education Program

Program Description
The Title I Migrant Education Program provides educational and support services for “migratory” students to ensure they have the same opportunities to meet the same academic standards as other children.  MDCPS Title I Migrant Education Program provides comprehensive supplemental services to ensure maximum academic achievement and the highest quality education for our migrant students.

Our funding supports high quality education programs for migratory children and helps ensure that migratory children who move among the states are not penalized in any manner by disparities among states in curriculum, graduation requirements, or state academic standards.  Funds also ensure that migratory children not only are provided with appropriate education and support services that address their special needs, but also that such children receive full and appropriate opportunities to meet the same challenging state academic content and standards that all students are expected to meet.

MDCPS Title I Migrant Education Program has been improving the lives of farm workers and their children by delivering free, supplemental educational and support services to the migrant community, and has made significant contributions toward curtailing the dropout rate among migrant high school students as evidenced by the number of migrant students graduating from high school.

Children of migrant workers are affected by repeated moves, disruption in schooling, poverty, health needs, social isolation, and language barriers.  These children run a greater risk of failing to meet the challenging state content and performance standards which all students are expected to meet.  Low academic achievement and frustration with school cause many migrant children to drop out in their early teens.  In order to reduce the impact of these educational barriers, the U.S. Congress authorized federal funding to establish the Migrant Education Program (MEP) in 1966 under the authority of Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA).  The United States Department of Education (USDOE) currently administers the Office of Migrant Education (OME) responsible for meeting the special needs of migratory children and youth.

The Title I Migrant Education Program provides supplemental instructional and support services to eligible children of migrant workers through the following components:

Migrant Early Childhood Learning Program (MECLP) provides services to eligible migrant preschool children at selected Migrant Housing Centers. Sites in the two main Migrant Housing Center: Redland and South Dade provide instruction for migrant three and four year old children.  The MECLP offers the developmentally appropriate Pre-K Waterford Early Learning and the Scholastic Big Day Early Childhood program curriculum. Additionally, food services, health screenings, and extended daycare is available.  Parental involvement is also an integral part of the program.  Parent participation in workshops, parent–teacher conferences and other school/community activities are infused to include parents as partners in their children’s educational process. The MECLP addresses the needs of the whole child, as children are involved in hands-on experiences with people, objects, ideas and events.

Migrant Achievement Resources (MAR) offers educational and support services designed to meet the needs of migrant student in Grades K-5.  MAR services are offered at selected elementary schools and K-2 Learning Centers.  MAR offers supplemental tutoring and technology-based instruction to eligible Priority For Service (PFS) students. MAR staff provides supplemental instruction based on current curriculum implemented by school personnel. MAR staff articulates with appropriate classroom teachers to ensure consistent curriculum. In addition, MAR staff monitors student attendance, provides educational referrals, expedites student record transfers, assists with conduct issues and organizes cultural activities.  Working in collaboration with the Title I Migrant Education Program Supportive Service Component, MAR staff assists with identification and recruitment, and completes Migrant Student Information Exchange (MSIX) for migrant students who transfer in and out of Miami-Dade County.  MAR staff also offers Support Service referrals, home visits and provides parental involvement activities.

Migrant Academic Planning and Achievement (MAPA Middle) offers a selection of services tailored to meet the needs of migrant students in grades 6-8 at selected middle school and K-8 Centers.  The Teacher/Advocate customizes services through the selection of several available models, which include: Tutorial, Attendance, Counseling, Educational Blueprint, and Career Awareness with opportunities designed to teach students how to foster and maintain a positive attitude toward education and life-long learning.  Cultural activities, educational technology, effective use of the internet, school attendance monitoring, education referrals are provided through MAPA.  Identification and recruitment, MSIX, support services referrals, and parental involvement activities are provided. 

Migrant Academic Planning and Achievement (MAPA High) offers a selection of services tailored to meet the needs of migrant students in grades 9-12 at selected secondary schools.  The Teacher/Advocate customizes services through the selection of several available models, which include: Go Out And Lead (GOAL), Career Awareness, Tutorial, Attendance, and Counseling with opportunities designed to teach students how to foster and maintain a positive attitude toward education and life-long learning.  Cultural activities, educational technology, effective use of the internet, school attendance monitoring, adult/vocational education referrals are provided through MAPA.  MAPA staff assists with identification and recruitment, and complete MSIX. Also, support services referrals, parental involvement activities are provided. Scholarships information, Portable Assisted Study Sequence (PASS, credit recovery program), FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) assistance, and participation in Mini-Corps Club and Close-Up program are provided by MAPA staff. All migrant student graduates are invited to participate in the Migrant Student Recognition Program.

Supportive Services primary function is to identify and recruit migrant students residing in the school District under the Title I Migrant Education Program. A major component under supportive services is the transfer of student records utilizing the Migrant Student Information Exchange (MSIX). Supportive services also provides advocacy for migrant students and promotes community-related migrant activities.  The Supportive services’ component assists migrant students and families in securing needed academic, health, dental, legal, social, housing, and other support services through its referral system. In addition, support services organizes the Family Resource Centers located at Redland and South Dade Centers, which provide clothing/food banks, educational workshops, parental training workshops, and school information in order to increase school and parental involvement. The Title I Migrant Education Program Supportive Services staff works closely with Parent Outreach Programs and community agencies to provide migrant families with a curriculum that prepares migrant parents with the skills, knowledge, and confidence to support their children’s education. Family literacy programs are also part of the Family Resource Centers and local Migrant Education Program schools. The Literacy Night initiative has given parents an opportunity to spend quality time with their child while becoming actively involved in the learning process. The Supportive Services component organizes the Migrant Parent Advisory Council (MPAC).  Its primary purpose is to offer migrant parents a forum to advise the District on migrant educational concerns and make recommendations in order to improve migrant students’ academic achievement. The MEP also encourages maximum migrant parent participation in the educational experiences of their children by bringing together the school, the home and educational influences for the good of all migrant children.  Another objective of the MPAC is to increase migrant parents’ knowledge and understanding of their parental role in their children’s education.

The Title I Migrant Education Program staff assists migrant students and their families with needed supportive services. Supportive services include attendance, guidance psychological, social, health, dental, vision, nutrition, outreach, advocacy, at-risk, transportation, and needs assessment services.

Extended School Day Program (ESP) services are offered at selected elementary schools and migrant housing centers for students in grades Pre-K-12.  Participants in the ESP receive supplemental highly qualified instruction/tutoring by state certified educators and trained professional staff. The primary goals are to enhance learning according to standards set by M-DCPS curriculum, Common Core and Next Generation Sunshine State Standards.  The accomplishment of these requirements is met through the usage of developmentally appropriate interventions that inspire students’ participation at ESP sites. Extended School Day Program services for elementary students include tutorials to prepare students for State assessments, such as FSA and EOC, subject instruction, homework assistance, Supplemental Educational Services opportunities, Boy Scouts, team sports, nutrition education, field trips, cultural activities, guest speakers, arts and crafts, and technology-based instruction.  Secondary students receive tutorials to prepare students for State assessments, such as FSA and EOC, homework assistance, peer/individualize counseling, technology-based instruction and Supplemental Educational Services opportunities. Learning is influenced through the usage of positive services to include mentoring students, peer/individual counseling, homework assistance, cultural activities, arts and crafts, computer lab technology, positive mentor speakers, Community Awareness Activities, and special instruction in State assessments subject matter for both Elementary and Secondary students. All students participate in supervised creative recreational activities that enhance wellness. Parental involvement activities are an important component of ESP. The Family Literacy Night is a monthly evening parent literacy activity, where Title I Migrant staff presents innovative and fun Literacy Activities to migrant parents and children attending the Extended School Day Program. Students and their parents are actively engaged while they read, interact and explore monthly themes. Family Literacy Nights are hosted by MEP staff at the 3 MEP ESP Centers, located in Redland, South Dade and Everglades Migrant Farmworker Housing Camps.

The Migrant Summer Program (MSP) offers summer supplemental educational and supportive services to eligible migrant students.  Services are offered through the Pre-K Program, Migrant Summer Reading Camp Program, Meals Program, Secondary Services Program, and Identification and Recruitment activities.  Focus will be on serving Pre-K, 3rd graders, 8th graders, and 10-12th graders.  Participants receive enrichment and tutorials to prepare students for State assessments, such FSA and EOC, and computer/internet skills, based on Next Generation Sunshine State Standards. The services will be offered at selected schools and at the main migrant housing centers.

Requirements for Implementation

A child is eligible for Title I Migrant Education Program services by meeting the “Migratory Child” federal definition:

The child is younger than 22 years of age and has not graduated from high school or does not hold a high school equivalency certificate.
The child is a migratory agricultural worker, a migrant fisher or has a parent, guardian, or spouse, who is a migrant agricultural worker, or a migrant fisher; and

The child has moved within the preceding 36 months to enable the child, the child’s parent, guardian, spouse, or a member of the child’s immediate family to seek or obtain temporary or seasonal employment in agricultural or fishing work.
Such employment is a Principal Means of Livelihood; and

The child has moved from one school district to another.
Federal regulations mandate that schools are made aware of the services that are available for children of migrant families.

Locations
Selected elementary, K-8 Centers, middle and senior high schools
Selected community/Housing Centers/Labor Camps

Budgetary Implications
Funded through Title I, Part C Grant and District Title I, Part A Budget


 

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